Potatoes, Carrots, Beans and Peas

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If you know anyone from the east coast of Canada, there is a good chance you have at least heard of Hodge Podge. I first ate this meal as a child visiting family in Nova Scotia during summer breaks. My great aunt made hers with a secret ingredient that I never learned, but I think I figured it out, however that will remain a family secret. The classic recipe combines new potatoes, new carrots, new green beans and fresh peas with butter, cream, whole milk, salt and pepper. There is some debate as to if you should add the milk/cream, some prefer it without but grew up with cream so it will be included in my recipe! Hodge Podge is a great way to use all the fresh seasonal ingredients for a simple but delicious one-pot meal.

Nova Scotia Hodge Podge

Ingredients

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·       2 cups   green/yellow beans, ends trimmed and cut into 1 inch pieces

·       1 cup     fresh peas, shelled

·       8-10      carrots, halved and cut into chunks

·       3 cups   new potatoes cut into chunks

·       1/2 cup butter

·       1/2 cup heavy cream

·       1/2 cup whole milk

·       Salt and Pepper

Directions

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Boil beans, carrots into a saucepan and add water to cover the vegetables. Lightly salt the water, and bring to a boil. Cook for about 1/2 hour, then add the potatoes and peas and cook for another 1/2 hour. Drain out the water, then stir in butter and if desired, cream and milk. Season with lots of salt and pepper and enjoy, also tastes great as leftovers.

Enjoy!

Holly Morris, RHN

Holly Morris is a registered holistic nutritionist and Reiki practitioner in Uxbridge, Ontario. Her mission is to facilitate her clients in finding and listening to their inner voice so their needs are met in all areas of life. Learn more about Holly at https://www.hmholisticwellness.com/







Callaloo (Wild Amaranth)

What is Callaloo/Wild Amaranth?

Available in Ontario throughout the summer in various stages

Available in Ontario throughout the summer in various stages

In Canada most people view these plants as weeds, similar to lambs quarters or pigweed. However, in the Caribbean amaranth is prized and is where the name callaloo comes from. In India amaranth is cultivated for their seeds (pseudo-grains) and leaves, and are eaten in South Africa as nutritious herbs.  Amaranth is one of the oldest food crops in the world and Amaranth seeds have now reached gluten-free, super food cult status.

You can eat Wild Amaranth in various stages. From seedling & small tender new leaf is great raw in salad or lightly cooked (better cooked). Mature leaf, stem and seed head can be cooked in soup, stew, saute, creamed, omelet, casserole etc

Callaloo Health Benefits

You may be pulling this plant or its out of your own garden, unaware that you can replace your beloved spinach and other go to greens for this abundant plant.  The leaf has a rich, deep, hearty green flavor, and is packed with nutrients.

It contains potassium helps to lower or maintain blood pressure and regulate heartbeat. Persons with kidney disease may want to avoid raw or cooked callaloo because it is a potassium-rich food.  The fibre in callaloo can help form good bowel movements, makes a person feel less hungry after eating, slows the absorption of glucose in the cells, traps excess fat in the intestines and lowers LDL (bad) cholesterol. These functions of fibre in callaloo helps to reduce the risk of obesity, controls blood-sugar levels and lowers the risk of heart disease.  Raw it is an excellent source of vitamin C, lightly cooking some of the vitamin C can be retained.  The protein content is higher in cooked callaloo, but is not a high quality protein. Therefore, callaloo should be added to a protein rich food.  Cooked it provides more iron than raw. However, to get the iron in the blood, callaloo should be consumed with vitamin C rich foods. The vitamin C helps to pull the iron into your blood.

Callaloo Coconut Curry

Serves 4 to 6.

Directions

  1. Wash/prep all greens (lightly chop up), leeks (slices) zucchini, garlic, onions

  2. In a soup pot at medium heat, saute onions in oil or ghee. After a couple minutes add in garlic and spices, continue cooking until onions are translucent.

  3. Add coconut milk and let it heat up before next step

  4. Add leeks and sun-dried tomatoes and zucchini

  5. Cook for 20 mins at med/low to get the flavours infused

  6. Add callaloo (or greens of choice) and cook for another 10 minutes

  7. Serve with a squeeze of lime and cilantro, over rice, noodles meat etc.

Ingredients

  • Large salad spinner worth (that is a real form of measurement, right?) of amaranth greens (callaloo) or another green leafy veg such as spinach or kale etc.

  • 2 cans of coconut cream or milk

  • 2 zucchini (or any summer squash variety)

  • 1 tbsp turmeric powder

  • 2 tsp each of cumin and coriander

  • 1 small onion

  • 2 large leeks.. or 4 small

  • 2 cloves of garlic

  • Cayenne powder or chili flakes to your spice tolerance

  • 4 sun-dried tomatoes

  • Salt and pepper

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Enjoy!

Holly Morris, RHN

Holly Morris is a registered holistic nutritionist and Reiki practitioner in Uxbridge, Ontario. Her mission is to facilitate her clients in finding and listening to their inner voice so their needs are met in all areas of life. Learn more about Holly at https://www.hmholisticwellness.com/

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Kohlrabi

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Kohlrabi is a German word that means cabbage and turnip. That basically sums up everything you need to know, but it will elaborate more since this veggie deserves its’ time to shine. Mildly sweet, crispy textured kohlrabi that has a mild flavour similar to radish, is notably rich in vitamins and dietary fiber.

·       Kohlrabi is a member of the brassica family, contains health-promoting phytochemicals such as isothiocyanates, sulforaphane, and indole-3-carbinol that can boost the immune system and help protect against certain cancers, such as colon cancer.

·       Raw kohlrabi stems are a rich source of vitamin-C. Vitamin-C (ascorbic acid) is a water-soluble vitamin, and powerful antioxidant. It helps the human body maintain healthy connective tissue, teeth, and gum. Vitamin-C has anti-oxidant properties which help reduce harmful free radicals from the body.

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·       It contains good amounts of many B vitamins such as niacin, vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine), thiamine, pantothenic acid, etc., which are co-factors to enzymes during various metabolism functions inside the body.

·       Studies show it has a good amount of copper, calcium, potassium, manganese, iron, and phosphorus. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure by countering effects of sodium.

*When it comes to minerals, I like to take into account the soil quality of where the food was grown

·       Don’t forget about the leaves! Kohlrabi leaves or tops, like turnip greens, are also very nutritious greens abundant in vitamin-A, vitamin-K, minerals, and the B-complex group of vitamins.


To store kohlrabi, when you bring it home, separate the leaves from the bulbs. Keep both parts, the leaves and the bulbs, in the fridge. Use the leaves within a few days, but the unpeeled bulbs will last for weeks.

Kohlrabi Slaw

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This salad filled with market fresh produce is a fresh side to any meal during the summer season. Most of veggies in the ingredients can be purchased at the market during July.

Ingredients

·       4-5 peeled Kohlrabi, cut into matchsticks

·       4-5 sliced radish

·       3-4 chopped green onions or chives

·       1 pear or apple cut into matchsticks

·       1 handful of sprouts

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·       Asiago Cheese from Cosmo’s Meats (optional, but highly recommended)

Dressing

·       1 cup olive oil (I used locally imported Sarafino)

·       2 tbsp apple cider vinegar

·       handful of fresh basil

·       3 garlic scapes

·       Salt & Pepper

·       A splash of maple syrup


Directions

Blend dressing ingredients in a food processor and put aside to let flavours combine. Then prepare rest of salad ingredients and add dressing. Best if left to marinate for a couple of hours before eating.

Enjoy!

Holly Morris, RHN

Holly Morris is a registered holistic nutritionist and Reiki practitioner in Uxbridge, Ontario. Her mission is to facilitate her clients in finding and listening to their inner voice so their needs are met in all areas of life. Learn more about Holly at https://www.hmholisticwellness.com/




Market Fresh Pesto

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Culinary herbs can bring any meal to life. With so many to choose from, the uses are endless. There is also no shortage of fresh greens in the warm summer months. Green foods provide detoxification support to your body as they are rich in chlorophyll which is essentially “plant blood”. Other benefits of eating greens includes boosts your immunity, improves digestion, promotes weight loss thanks to tons of fiber, and may help regulate cholesterol levels, blood sugar and blood pressure. This is the season for incorporating a variety of fresh green foods into your diet.

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This simple pesto can be added to anything, including salad dressing and on grilled veggies or meat. It is also a great way to use up excess greens or the ones you find at the back of your fridge a week after the market. I love using mint, arugula, cilantro or basil, as the base flavours in pesto blends but feel free to use your favourites. In the recipe below you will see I used raw stinging nettle. The “sting” goes away once it is blended, I promise! You can also add micro-greens to the blend for another boost in nutrition. This week I ate my pesto on grilled asparagus with locally raised elk steaks I got at the market.


Market Fresh Pesto

These measurements are guidelines, feel free to add more or less depending on what you like.

  • Roughly 2-3 cups of fresh herbs and greens (I used mint, nettle, cilantro, rosemary)

  • 1-2 cloves of fresh or roasted garlic

  • 1/2 bunch chives

  • Juice of 1 lemon

  • 1/3-1/2 cup olive oil

  • Salt & pepper

Add all ingredients to a food processor and blend. Store in fridge for up to a week.

Sage and Shepherd Farm

Sage and Shepherd Farm

T-bone Elk Steak

T-bone Elk Steak

Happy creating!

Holly Morris, RHN

Holly Morris is a registered holistic nutritionist and Reiki practitioner in Uxbridge, Ontario. Her mission is to facilitate her clients in finding and listening to their inner voice so their needs are met in all areas of life. Learn more about Holly at https://www.hmholisticwellness.com/

Green Onions and Green Garlic

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Green onions and green garlic are immature onions that haven’t been allowed to ‘bulb’ or are from varieties that don’t create bulbs.  One way to use up the season’s bounty is to make your own seasoning powder.  You don’t even need a dehydrator; you could use the oven at a low temperature or even a solar oven.  Store-bought seasonings usually contain preservatives, artificial flavours and many other questionable ingredients.  These aromatic alliums are some of the first foods we see at the market.  They are so versatile and are a staple flavour in most cooking.  Try them in your eggs, pasta,  on meats, potatoes, savory scones or simply as a garnish.  With food waste at an all time high, this is great way to preserve and enjoy local food all year round. 

Health Benefits of Onions and Garlic

The Allium family, which also includes leeks, shallots, and chives offer potentially powerful disease-fighting properties for everyone. Garlic has been used as a antioxidant and proven beneficial with managing cholesterol and blood pressure.  It is also great for the immune system, with anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties.  Onions are high in B vitamins, and vitamin C.  It’s been studied that onions help reduce oxidative stress, boost antioxidant levels and decrease bone loss. This may prevent osteoporosis and boost bone density.

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Green Onions & Green Garlic Seasoning

·       Cut off root ends.

·       Wash and pick through to remove discolored or damaged pieces. Check with the lower stems for dirt.

·       Chop into small, relatively uniform pieces.

·       For dehydrator, I set to a medium temperature and let go until they are crispy (roughly 6-8 hours)

·       For oven, set to lowest temp and let go for a couple of hours, keeping an eye and checking when they have released their moisture.

·       For drying in the sun, place on a baking sheet, and place covered with glass.  An example, I will use an old window on top of bricks positioned in a rectangular shape.  You can also buy a solar oven, but this works in the meantime. 

·       Once dry, place in a food processor and blitz until it is in small flakes.  There is an option to add salt at this step to bring out more flavour. 

·       When I made it I found I have to dehydrate for a short while after the previous step as more moisture had released from the whiter ends in the processing step. 

·       Store in a well sealed jar and store in a cool dry place.

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Holly Morris is a registered holistic nutritionist and Reiki practitioner in Uxbridge, Ontario. Her mission is to facilitate her clients in finding and listening to their inner voice so their needs are met in all areas of life. Learn more about Holly at https://www.hmholisticwellness.com/